Health

Childbirth in Ancient Egypt: Nature’s Unique Work of Art

Childbirth in Ancient Egypt: Nature’s Unique Work of Art

Magical approaches were not simply the consequence of an inadequate body of scientific knowledge. Analysis of a variety of ancient gynecological artifacts, including rituals and incantations along with tools and treatment instructions more contemporarily regarded as scientific, illustrates that they are profoundly intertwined with science to promote not only the physical health but also the mental wellbeing of Egyptian women.

Mindfulness in Times of Distress: Glitter Jars

“So...who’s ever been stressed at Stanford?”
I half-jokingly asked this question to a group of undergrads, PhD students, and faculty on a rainy Thursday night. It was the middle of the quarter, right before the dreaded “midterm season.” With upcoming deadlines for projects and tests, while balancing extracurriculars and friendships, students can feel overwhelmed by all of their commitments.

The Emotions of Mice & Men

The Emotions of Mice & Men

What makes a human being? This question, which has been asked since the beginning of history, takes on a different interpretation when applied to translational research. Scientists use animals, from apes to zebrafish, as models for the human body. This practice, which extends back to the ancient Greeks, changes the question from “What makes a human being?” to “What are the core necessities for being human-like?” Up until recently, the criteria for being sufficiently human-like has been solely physiological.

Compassionate Use: An Analysis of the Ethical Frameworks of Expanded Access Programs

Expanded Access Programs allow severely ill patients with no alternative treatment options immediate access to FDA-unapproved investigational new drugs outside of clinical trials. Also referred to as compassionate use, EAPs are meant to create fair medical access for those in extreme need of the treatment. Unfortunately, due to inconsistent application and variations in modern interpretation of medical responsibility, EAPs fail to embody fairness, resulting in ethical inefficiencies in its implementation.

The Rise of Flying Vaccinations

The buzzing of mosquitos is a harbinger of summer. Long thought to harbor dangerous diseases, these pests are now being used in biomedical research to treat a host of deadly illnesses. In 2010, a group of Japanese researchers at Jichi Medical University attached SP15, a vaccine against Leishmaniasis, to the promoters of the mosquito genome that turn off saliva-producing genes.