Health

Pre-Check for Medical Devices? Considerations for the FDA's new software pipeline

Pre-Check for Medical Devices? Considerations for the FDA's new software pipeline

As medical technology becomes more sophisticated, the future of medicine seems increasingly uncertain. Diagnostic machinery and medical devices already dominate modern hospitals, suggesting that the future of healthcare will depend on the development and adoption of new technology.

A way to live as long as the Redwoods?

A way to live as long as the Redwoods?

Palo Alto’s name literally means “tall stick”, referring to the more-than-a-thousand-year-old El Palo Alto, a coast redwood lying near the edge of the city. Today, the city is more commonly known for its ties to Stanford, a high cost of living, and that good ol’ Silicon Valley start-up culture. However, many of the valley’s wealthiest seem to be turning to the city’s namesake to inspire the next big biotech innovation. Bezos, Page, and Brin are just some of the names currently investing in technology aiming to halt, or even reverse, the aging process.

Why do we sleep? Understanding the connection between sleep and Alzheimer’s Disease

Why do we sleep? Understanding the connection between sleep and Alzheimer’s Disease

Imagine waking up in the morning after a good night’s sleep. Your thinking is sharper, your memories are clearer, and you may even feel a lot happier about the day. Every organism studied by scientists has a period of sleep, although requirements for duration and physiological patterns may differ between species. Sleep is critical for memory, thinking, and physical health. Diseases or disorders that cause loss of sleep or changes in sleep patterns often lead to health problems. Our bodies let us know when we aren’t getting enough sleep and we all intuitively understand that sleep is important, but have you ever wondered exactly why humans need to sleep?

Break it down, to build it up: an interview with John Ioannidis

Break it down, to build it up: an interview with John Ioannidis

As a Professor of Medicine,  Health Research and Policy, and Statistics at Stanford University, John Ioannidis has profoundly changed the field of meta-analysis. His paper, Why Most Published Research Findings Are False, which garnered more than 2.7 million readers, offers a mathematical model to calculate the PPV, positive predictive value, which evaluates the likelihood that a research result claimed to be statistically significant is true.

Sleeping with Two Clocks

Sleeping with Two Clocks

By successfully isolating the period gene and PER, the protein encoded by period, Jeffrey Hall and Michael Rosbash discovered the molecular mechanism that regulates our biological clock (circadian rhythm). This groundbreaking work won them the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Another Nobel laureate, Michael Young, discovered the TIM protein, which combines with PER to form an inhibitory feedback loop. Combining their work, we now understand the circadian cycle as the accumulation of the PER protein at night and the degradation of it during the daytime. The key role of PER protein as a biosignal highlights the function of cell signaling in our physiological functions.

Everyday Health Sensors: How Accurate are They?

Everyday Health Sensors: How Accurate are They?

If you cracked open a dictionary and looked up the word “couch potato” prior to me coming to Stanford, my name would have been written all over the page. So when I joined Stanford Women in Rugby and realized I could only run .2 seconds until fading from existence, I decided to start running everyday. I own an Apple Watch (thanks Costco sales!) and love tracking how many miles I have run and how many calories I burn from it. But I started to wonder just how much should I believe my watch…

Childbirth in Ancient Egypt: Nature’s Unique Work of Art

Childbirth in Ancient Egypt: Nature’s Unique Work of Art

Magical approaches were not simply the consequence of an inadequate body of scientific knowledge. Analysis of a variety of ancient gynecological artifacts, including rituals and incantations along with tools and treatment instructions more contemporarily regarded as scientific, illustrates that they are profoundly intertwined with science to promote not only the physical health but also the mental wellbeing of Egyptian women.

Mindfulness in Times of Distress: Glitter Jars

“So...who’s ever been stressed at Stanford?”
I half-jokingly asked this question to a group of undergrads, PhD students, and faculty on a rainy Thursday night. It was the middle of the quarter, right before the dreaded “midterm season.” With upcoming deadlines for projects and tests, while balancing extracurriculars and friendships, students can feel overwhelmed by all of their commitments.